Monday, June 24, 2024

Funding announced for WA Aboriginal cultural heritage projects

Seven not-for-profit Aboriginal organisations are set to benefit from WA Government funding for 11 projects which protect significant Aboriginal heritage sites across the state.

Grants of up to $50,000 through the 2023-24 Preserve, Promote and Protect our Aboriginal Sites program will support on-the-ground works at Aboriginal sites, promote Aboriginal cultural heritage and provide social and economic benefits to local communities, said Aboriginal Affairs Minister, Tony Buti.

“The Government’s record funding for this year’s program is testament to our unwavering support to help foster strong economic and social benefits for Aboriginal communities,” said the Minister.

“Over the past 10 years, the State Government has committed more than $2.5 million through the grants to support Aboriginal organisations and communities in preserving and protecting Aboriginal heritage sites across Western Australia.

“In particular, grant funding has increased significantly under my term as Minister for Aboriginal Affairs as we explore opportunities each year to bolster the allocated funding and support more projects.”

Three grants totalling more than $130,000 will help the Yued Aboriginal Corporation to conduct initial heritage and environmental assessments of registered Aboriginal sites across the South West region – including the former Mogumber Mission – identifying threatening or damaging conditions and recording digital stories of the area.

On behalf of the Budina People, the Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation in the Mid West region will use over $100,000 in grant funding for three projects to construct fencing at Lyndon Station protecting important rock art from livestock, install fencing at the Djadabunna Trapyard water source to provide a protective barrier from cattle and to rehabilitate Nunginjay Spring.

In the Pilbara, the Budadee Aboriginal Corporation will use a grant of more than $48,000 funding to install signage at Tambourah Spring, informing visitors to the site about the cultural heritage values.

Grant funding for a project led by Nowanup Noongar Boodjar Ltd in the South West will bring Elders to the Carlawilgieup Rockhole, accompanied by an anthropologist/historian and an ecologist, for recording of stories and cultural knowledge and to develop appropriate site protection and rehabilitation measures.

“These sites hold great social and cultural significance for Aboriginal communities, connecting them with their past, present and future,” said Dr Buti.

“Aboriginal people are best placed to manage their unique cultural heritage and this grant program is empowering Elders and young people alike to promote greater cultural understanding and appreciation of their heritage to all Western Australians.”

The 2023-24 Preserve, Promote and Protect our Aboriginal Sites Grants Program has operated for more than 10 years and is part of the State Government’s commitment to empower Aboriginal people in managing their unique cultural heritage.

Grants are used to undertake site restorations, protect Aboriginal burial areas, install interpretive signage and deliver on-the-ground land management works.

More information about the program and this year’s recipients is available online at https://www.wa.gov.au/government/document-collections/grants-preserve-and-protect-aboriginal-sites.

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